Author Archives: Nick Stuart-Miller

How To Use Your Garden in Winter

Use your garden this winter - bird feedingWinter can be a quieter time in your garden, and even the most enthusiastic of gardeners may want to stay indoors when the colder weather strikes. However, especially in a country where winter can go on for a while, it seems a shame not to use your outdoor space for months on end.

So how can you continue to enjoy your garden over winter, and keep those green fingers green?

Here are some ways in which you can use your garden in the colder months:

Help wildlife survive

As lovely as it is to stay warm and cosy indoors over winter, it is important to remember that not everyone has the option! Feel good about yourself by helping the birds, and the bees have an easier time by leaving out seeds and water for birds as well as bird boxes if they need a place to shelter. You can also keep your garden bee-friendly by keeping your compost heap going, growing ivy which provides handy cover as well as nectar, growing winter flowers and creating twig and leaf piles for protection too.

Appreciate winter plants

Just because you might not want to spend hours sitting out in your garden over winter, doesn’t mean you can’t keep it looking good. Pretty plants such as Cyclamen coum, hellebores, snowdrops, crocus, and aconites all provide colour and interest over the winter months. So stock up on these seasonal plants and flowers, and then you can still admire the garden even if it’s from the comfort of indoors!

Have a good old tidy up

Winter is the perfect time to get your garden in ship shape before the warmer weather arrives. When the sun comes out you’ll no doubt want to spend more time gardening and just relaxing in your outside space so bite the bullet, put on a thick jumper and some good gloves and get out there to tackle all those slightly less glamorous jobs such as pruning, sweeping, sharpening your tools and organising your garden shed.

Utilise your greenhouse

If you are pining to plant or desperate to dig you can try to keep those winter blues at bay by heading to your greenhouse where you can grow citrus plants or start sowing seeds ready to transfer to the garden come spring. If the weather gets particularly severe rather than moving more vulnerable seedlings into your home, you can provide extra insulation by wrapping with bubble wrap.

Pay attention to your veg plot

While winter isn’t an ideal time for many plants, the great news is that many vegetables do well over winter and you can enjoy homegrown parsnips, leeks, winter cabbages, kale, and winter salad varieties too. Winter is also a great time to plant fruit bushes, raspberries, rhubarb and garlic which should come good later in the year.

Have a winter garden party!

Now that you’ve got your garden looking great why not celebrate by inviting your nearest and dearest over for a winter garden party? Wrap up warm, invest in a fire pit or chimenea, get some outdoor lights, mull some cider and enjoy your outside space despite the cold.

These top tips mean you can enjoy your garden all year round! For more gardening tips and advice why not check out the rest of our blog? And if your garden needs some TLC to give it a boost after winter frosts take a look at our range of topsoils, soil conditioner, compost and mulches, and lawn turf to help get it back to its very best?

New Year New Garden – Inspiration For Your Garden in 2019!

Inspiration for your garden - colourful garden wall

If you are looking to give your garden a makeover in the new year we have some great inspiration for your garden below. Follow these tips to create a unique, vibrant outdoor space that you’ll love.

Inside meets outside

If you have a courtyard, terrace or patio garden a popular trend for 2019 is to try and seamlessly blend the room leading into your garden with the outside space, thus creating a lovely flow – bringing a bit of your garden into your home and vice versa. Do this through smart decor decisions, colour themes, and soft furnishings to create a seamless and unique space.

Pots galore for a quick win

Pots bursting with an arrangement of colourful, vibrant plants can instantly transform any garden. Containers come in all shapes and sizes, colours and patterns and in a range of different materials too, so it’s so easy to put your stamp on your garden without having to do too much prep. Just choose your pots and plants, make sure you use high-quality soil to ensure their longevity and sit back and admire your handiwork with a nice cup of tea! Pots provide a perfect solution for the time-poor gardener, and if you get bored with your new look moving the positions of the containers, switching up the plants and flowers or swapping out the pots for different designs instantly gives you a fresh new look.

Real grass shows class

An impactful way to revamp your garden is to put a real lawn down. There is nothing more beautiful than looking out of your window to a stretch of lush green grass and laying lawn turf or planting grass seed can provide you with just that. Why not scatter some wildflower seeds in amongst the grasses for a colourful country garden look too?

Quirky planters to make your garden stand out

2019 is the year to get creative with your garden so why not think outside the box and use some unusual vessels to house your plants and flowers. Anything from a grand piano to a handbag, typewriter or wellington boot could add a touch of magic and imagination to your outdoor space.

Relaxing is what it’s all about

Gardens are there to be enjoyed, so make sure in 2019 you keep things simple. It’s all well and good having a beautiful garden, but if it takes up all your spare time maintaining it, you are missing the point. The joy of a great garden is to be able to sit back, breathe in the fresh air, admire the beauty of nature, soak up some rays, entertain friends, and enjoy the space you’ve created. So make your garden an area you can unwind in to ensure you make the most of it.

Eco-friendly is important

Look after the bees and the birds as well as other wildlife by making sure your garden is as eco-friendly as possible. Leave out bird feeders and water baths. Plant bee-attracting flowers and use natural weedkillers to make sure that you don’t upset any visitors that arrive in your garden. Buying hardier plants that don’t need too much watering and using a top-quality soil with great filtration will help to keep your garden healthy without having to use too much water. Recyclable pots, peat-free composts, and solar lighting are all plus points also.

Colour is the key to change

Garden furniture ranges used to be limited regarding colours and designs. However, now you can get garden furniture in any colour or pattern imaginable. You can also think about the colours of your soft furnishings,  decorative pathways and stones, pots, walls, flooring, lights and of course your flowers and plants. Say goodbye to dull, stiffly designed gardens in 2019 and instead get creative and go colour crazy for bright, striking spaces that will bring a smile to everyone’s face.

If you are looking to give your garden a facelift in 2019, use the tips above to make it as dramatic, lively and enjoyable as possible.

If you have a garden project and need some advice why not get in touch with our friendly team on 01306877540 today?

Winter Gardening Tips – What To Plant & What To Protect

winter garden

Winter can be a sad time for gardeners. The weather turns colder, the frosts make the ground unworkable, and all the beautiful blooms of spring and summer are but a distant memory.

Many people tend not to venture into the garden much during winter, and just let nature take its course until the milder climate returns. However, neglecting your garden during the colder months can mean you make life harder for yourself, and you could find that without a bit of love and care some of your more delicate plants take a beating, making it tougher for them to return to their former glory later in the year.

It’s also worth noting that a garden can be enjoyed all year round. Even if it’s just to admire it from the cosiness of your kitchen or living room. Many plants come into their own in colder weather, and you can still enjoy a vibrant, thriving outdoor space when winter comes a-knocking.

So let’s take a look at what gardeners can do to keep their gardens looking great this winter.

What to plant in your garden this winter

Plant out winter bedding. Winter bedding plants are an ideal solution to sad, bare borders. Choose hardy shrubs and plants with lots of foliage to bulk out these areas, bringing some greenery and life back into the garden.

Grow fresh food. There is nothing more satisfying than growing your own food, and greens such as lettuce, arugula and mustard, kale and Swiss chard can all do well in colder temperatures. There are plenty of root crops and brassicas that will develop over winter in time for a spring harvest too.

Invest in some colourful winter-blooming plants. If your garden is looking a little bleak then lift your spirits by injecting some colour. Plants such as winter hazel, witch hazel, and honeysuckle are elegant and attractive, and bulbs such as snowdrops, species crocus, and winter aconite can also bring a smile to one’s face as they pop up through the snow and let you know that spring is on the way.

What to protect in your garden this winter

Before the severe frosts arrive, make sure you protect your garden by thoroughly watering the soil. Once they come, you can keep shrubs and plants safe by mulching bases with shredded leaves,  bark or woodchip for added insulation.

Any newly planted trees or shrubs should be wrapped with a layer of burlap stuffed with an insulating material like dried leaves or straw to keep them safe from the frost.

Get your garden tidy and clear up fallen leaves, berries, and other debris from lawns, decking, and ponds before they decompose and cause damage.

Winter doesn’t just mean colder weather, but wetter weather too so raise plants in pots onto pot feet to stop them waterlogging. Outdoor containers will also benefit from insulation; bubblewrap can be used to protect plants from the cold.

Roses are prone to wind-rock which can uproot them and damage them irreversibly. By pruning them back, gardeners give roses the best chance of standing up to the high winds that winter brings.

Fruit trees are prone to winter moth damage, and by using grease bands around the trunks, gardeners can protect them from these pests.

Remember, it’s easy to focus on protecting your plants, but winter is a harsh season for all wildlife and putting out bird food can help hungry birds survive these months, and bring cheering life into the garden too.

If the unpleasant weather is too off-putting then why not bring a little of the outdoors inside? Growing bulbs such as paperwhite narcissus or amaryllis indoors can help keep gardeners fingers green without having to the brave the cold!

Keeping your soil in excellent condition is a year-round job. Make sure you don’t neglect your soil this winter and keep it healthy with our Soil Conditioner, Composts & Mulches.

By following our winter gardening tips, you can enjoy your garden throughout the seasons and make sure it’s healthy and protected over the winter months to get back to its beautiful, blooming best come spring.

 

Christmas decor on a shed

Wooden Garden Shed Maintenance – A Winter Guide

Wooden garden shed maintenance is an essential task that every garden lover needs to get done before winter hits.

Do these tasks now and you’ll help protect your garden shed from the harsh weather, prevent mould and mildew, stop leaks, protect your logs and kindling and help your garden shed to stay in great condition for many years to come.

Here’s our garden shed maintenance checklist to help guide you through the most important tasks.

Garden Shed Maintenance- Your Checklist

1. Clear away leaves and debris

Perhaps the easiest and most beneficial garden shed maintenance task you can do right now is to simply clear away any leaves, twigs or other debris that can accumulate around the sides of your shed. This will help prevent leaks and other damage from happening over the winter.

2. Install gutters

Every shed needs to have a good guttering system so you can direct rainwater away and prevent it from end up collecting in pools under your shed, causing the base and walls to rot. So now is the time to make that investment and get them fitted.

For extra eco-friendly brownie points, consider connecting the guttering to a water butt that you can use to collect rainwater for watering your garden.

3. Open those doors and windows

Even though it might feel cold outside, it’s just as important to open the windows and doors of your shed during the winter. This helps to keep the air flowing through, helps prevent mould and mildew forming inside your shed and helps keep nasty smells away.

4. Wipe away mould

Throughout the winter, one of the most important garden shed maintenance tasks you can do is to keep an eye out for mould growth on the windows, walls and doors. If you spot a problem, simply wipe away with a mild mixture of bleach and water to prevent it from spreading.

5. Apply a wood treatment

Every year, make sure you apply a wood stain or other wood treatment before the worst of the weather sets in. This will help your garden shed to stay in great condition for many years to come. We recommend you use a water-based treatment these are quick to dry and provide great protection against the elements.

6. Oil those locks and hinges

There’s nothing worse than coming to open up your shed in the spring and finding that your locks and hinges have become rusty and broken. Prevent this from happening by applying regular sprays of oil throughout the winter.

7. Give the roof some attention

It’s also worth checking your roof for wear and tear before the winter arrives. If it’s damaged, any rain, snow or ice could seep through to the wood of your shed. This could cause structural damage or leaks which could prevent any logs or kindling from staying dry throughout the winter months.

8. Check those windows & doors

Windows and door frames can also be very vulnerable to the elements, so make sure you give them some TLC before winter sets in. Gently wash the frames with soapy water, dig out any rot, fill with exterior grade wood filler then treat as necessary.

Follow our wooden garden shed maintenance checklist and you’ll protect your garden shed from the harsh winter weather and keep it looking great well into the spring.

 

railwaysleepers

Using Railway Sleepers in Your Garden: Project Ideas for Homeowners

Railway sleepers are those rectangular pieces of wood that you’ll see supporting railway tracks. They help the rails stay evenly spaced, upright, and in the correct shape.

But did you know that they’re also fabulous for creating stunning garden features?

Use them in your garden project and you’ll transform the look and feel of your garden, and perhaps even make the neighbours green with envy.

Here are some tips on how you can include railway sleepers in your garden, including project ideas, how to lay railway sleepers and where you can buy them.

Railway sleeper project ideas

Railway sleepers make a versatile, attractive and hard-wearing addition to any garden, adding natural texture and an eco-conscious feel to your outside space.

Here are our favourite ways you can use them.

1. Create a path

Make a great easy pathway on grass or gravel to add a touch of rustic chic to your outdoor space.

2. Build some garden steps

If you’re not a fan of bricks or stone, why not use those sleepers to make some steps instead? You can create the exact garden look that you want, they age really well, and they’re very straightforward to make.

3. Edge your veg

You could also use your railway sleepers to create an attractive boundary between your vegetables, flowers and the rest of your garden.

4. Build a raised bed

If you have poor soil quality, minimal space or you’d just like to keep your plants contained, use those sleepers to create a raised bed.

5. Craft a bench

Railway sleepers can also be used to create a stylish and rustic-looking bench which will fit perfectly in your garden design scheme.

6. Border your lawn

To create an effortless boundary for your lawn, lay some railway sleepers and then sit back to enjoy your handiwork!

Laying railway sleepers

Once you’ve decided which project you want to tackle, you can get stuck in! Here’s how:

Gather your tools

You only need a bare minimum of tools when you use railway sleepers in your garden. Usually, this involves a saw, a hammer, a screwdriver, wood screws, nails, a spirit level and safety equipment like gloves and goggles.

Clear the area

Before you start laying the railway sleepers, you also need to ensure the area is clear from unwanted vegetation and materials like rocks, roots and rubble.

Create your foundations

Next, you’ll need to prepare the area and then dig a shallow, level trench (unless you’re creating a piece of garden furniture), then add a bedding mixture to hold those sleepers in place. This will create solid foundations for your project.

Get building!

Once you’ve done this, you can start building your creation, using a combination of wood screws, nails or galvanised straps.  Make sure you use your spirit level to keep everything looking professional.

Finish off

Then it’s time to trim away any excess material, gently round the edges of the wood and treat using a wood preservative if required. If you’re creating a planter, this is when you’d add your high-quality topsoil before standing back and appreciating the fruits of your labour!

Voila! You’re done.

Where can you buy railway sleepers?

The good news is that it’s easy to find railway sleepers for sale these days. You can find them in most garden centres and also online.

If you’re looking for railway sleepers in Sussex, Surrey and London, look no further than our dedicated page.

Railway sleepers add a unique touch to any garden space, so why not dive into one of these projects and transform your outside space?

premium grade topsoil

What Causes Poor Soil Quality and How Can You Fix It?

Poor soil quality is every gardener’s worst nightmare.

There’s nothing worse than carefully planning and creating your perfect garden, only to produce vegetables, fruit or flowers that are weak, unhealthy and altogether disappointing.

Without healthy soil, all your gardening efforts could be in vain because healthy soil is essential for strong, nutritious, high-yielding plants that can resist pests and diseases and look beautiful in your garden.

If this sounds like your garden, don’t despair. Poor soil quality is a relatively common gardening problem. With some topsoil TLC, it can soon be improved.

So today let’s discuss how to spot if you have poor quality soil, why this happens, and how buying high-quality topsoil can help.

How do you know if your soil is poor quality?

Poor quality soil is usually very easy to spot because of its appearance, water drainage, the quality of your crops, and the presence or absence of weeds and other wildlife in your garden.

Soil texture

Soil that is hard to work, overly cloddy, loose, fine and sandy, ‘floury’, or filled with stones and pebbles are of poor quality. You’ll notice that any water tends to absorb water poorly and drain poorly. drain poorly and potentially flood.

Crop quality

If your tomato crop constantly suffers from blight or diseases, your cucumbers don’t grow as large as they should, or you suffer from other problems with crops or flowers, you are probably suffering from poor soil quality.

Local wildlife

Another surprising way you can tell if your soil is poor quality is by looking at the wildlife that visits. If there’s less healthy wildlife such as worms and bees around, and/or an excess of weeds, it’s time to improve that soil quality!

What causes poor soil quality?

Poor soil quality is often caused by one of these five factors:

  • Over-farming. Growing too many crops in one space year after year removes essential nutrients like nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus from the soil.

  • Infrequent crop rotation. Without adequate crop rotation, the demand for the same nutrients is high, leading to a long-term shortage and poor quality soil.

  • Draught or water shortages. Dry soil causes essential nutrients to gather in ‘clusters’ in the soil, making it much harder for those plant roots to reach.

  • Flooding or heavy rain. Soil that is overly wet will leach nutrients and essential topsoil can wash away.

  • Soil contamination. Overuse of toxins or chemical can contaminate the soil and reduce soil fertility.

  • New homes. A large portion of the healthy topsoil gets stripped away during home building, leaving behind poor quality soil that is less fertile.

How to fix poor quality soil

Thankfully, improving your soil quality and growing better plants is easy.

Pop to your local garden centre and select a high-quality topsoil that is high in nutrients and organic matter. (We provide topsoil and landscape supplies in Sussex, Surrey and London that would be perfect for the job!)

These topsoils are great for all garden purposes including improving your existing soil quality, and creating new beds, borders, raised beds or even lawns.

Topsoil prices vary, depending on what grade soil you choose:

  • Premium grade topsoil: Highly fertile, great structure and should be free from weed seeds.

  • General purpose: Great for creating new beds, borders and for laying new lawns. Comes in different screen size grades.

  • Economy: More affordable. Usually comes unscreened. Ideal for increasing the quantity of soil in your garden.

If you are struggling with poor quality soil, remember that there is hope. Simply invest in some high-quality specialist soils and you will soon produce a beautiful, healthy garden to be proud of.

Gardening Gift Ideas Christmas Guide

Gardening Gift Ideas Christmas Guide | Bury Hill blog

As a nation of garden lovers, it’s no surprise that searches for gardening gift ideas are already surging in the run-up to Christmas. With so much on offer, gardening enthusiasts are spoilt for choice in the shops throughout the year, but what should their loved ones look for to provide a special Christmas gift that they’ll love? We’ve split up the gardening gifts market into popular searches right now to see what’s on offer.

Gardening in an apartment for city living

Decorative shelves – perfect for mounting on a wall for much-loved pot plants for green living in a city

Hanging pots – an alternative way to present prized blooms, either as a space-saving indoor feature or strung up outside a balcony

Herb seeds – hardy and handy, herbs make an essential accessory on top of the smallest window sill.

Gardening gadgets for the modern gardener

Macro phone lens: for those who love to proudly show off their hard work in the garden online. A magnifying clippable lens for Android of iPhone enables users to take eye-popping macro photos, anytime and anywhere

Solar lights – affordable tea lights transform a dark, dingy space into a colourful space for entertaining throughout the year

Weatherproof outdoor speakers – splash out a little more on a musical gadget for a loved one to enjoy in the garden, come rain or shine

Unusual gardening gifts

Vintage planter – trendy and full of character, vintage, worn planters are on-trend and in-demand. Look online for the best deals

Unique garden ornament – you needn’t pick up a garden gift for your nearest centre. Hundreds of independent sellers offer unique products for the garden, from furniture and statues to planters and children’s products, that you can’t find anywhere else

Jewellery – say ‘Happy Christmas’ with a piece of botanical jewellery, that’s both delicate and personal

Garden tools to cover the essentials

A shorted handed trowel – perfect for planting, weeding and maintenance in a smaller space

A high-quality set of gardening gloves – store them away from direct sunlight and moisture for durability

Watering can – OK, this won’t fit in a stocking, but a quirky, colourful watering can is sure to go down a treat

Transform any outdoor space with Bury Hill garden products

Whether you’re shopping or having a sneaky browse for your own garden, you can count on Bury Hill to provide the high-quality products to transform any garden space. From attractive decorative stone for water features and pathways to nourishing premium topsoils and loams, discuss your requirements with our team on 01306 877540 to determine delivery and pricing

aquatic-plants-biotope-flowers-46231

A Beginner’s Guide to Autumn and Winter Pond Care

The autumn and winter are the toughest months of the year for our garden ponds. This means it’s vitally important to tackle those essential pond care jobs before the coldest weather comes.

Get it right and you’ll ensure your fish are healthy, pond plants thrive and that it all looks beautiful when the warmer weather comes around again.

6-step autumn and winter pond care action plan

Here’s our foolproof autumn and winter pond care guide that will help you take care of these remaining garden pond care jobs quickly and easily.

1. Remove fallen leaves

We all love to crunch our way through those autumn leaves, but they’re one of the main causes of pond problems during the autumn and winter. Once they fall into your pond, they start to decay and can disrupt the fragile ecosystem of your pond, killing your fish and harming any wildlife living there.

So make it your priority to skim away those leaves once they start to fall before they can do any harm. Don’t forget to remove them from any decorative stones, pond pumps and pond ornaments, too!

If your pond lies within close range of a tree, or leaves are a real problem, it’s also worth considering covering your pond with protective netting (also useful when it comes to deterring predators – see below – or investing in a pond filter.

2. Keep your pond free from ice

When the big freeze comes, it’s vital to make sure that your pond isn’t completely covered with ice. Gases from any rotting plants or organisms can soon build up, precious oxygen levels can drop and it could potentially damage your pond liner.

Prevent this from happening by placing a floating pond de-icer, a clean ball or a clean plastic bottle containing a few stones into the pond water.

If you leave it too late, don’t panic. Simply pour a small amount of warm water onto a small patch of ice, allow it to melt, and keep the hole open using the tips above. Whatever you do, definitely don’t shatter the ice as this can traumatise and even kill your fish.

3. Give your pond plants some love

Another great way to avoid rotting leaves, dying plants and other cold season havoc is to look after those pond plants before the weather gets too cold.

Start by removing any dead or dying leaves from your pond plants and tossing them on your compost heap. Also, make sure that their roots are planted deep enough so they have a better chance of surviving the winter.

Then, completely remove any plants that don’t like being submerged in the icy water, such as Japanese Iris or Cardinal Flower. Pop them into your garden until the spring rolls around again, top up with some nourishing premium grade topsoil, and you’ll have healthy, strong plants for next year.

4. Cut down on fish food

Even though fish don’t hibernate like many other animals, they do descend to the deeper, warmer waters in your pond and their metabolisms slow significantly once the outside temperatures drop. This means that you’ll need to feed them much less than you usually do.

Stick to just one or two small helpings per week during the autumn. Once temperatures drop below 10°C, you should stop feeding them altogether.

Most importantly, be sure that there’s no food left floating around as this could pollute your pond water, damaging the pond ecosystem.

5. Beware of predators

The autumn and winter are dangerous months for any fish living in your garden pond as there’s less food around and so more hungry predators looking for a snack. Make sure they don’t take a fancy to your Koi Carp or goldfish by covering your pond with high-quality netting or adding a scarecrow to your garden.

6. Consider switching off your pond pump

If temperatures drop below freezing, it’s a wise idea to turn off your pond pump.

Cold water contains plenty of oxygen already, and the metabolism of your fish will slow down anyway. Plus, you’ll save money on electricity costs and give yourself have a great opportunity to clean the pond pump ready for next year.

So, before it gets too chilly outside, make sure you’re preparing your garden pond for the colder weather. It needn’t take long and that little bit of effort will be well worth it! It’s also worth noting that wooden pond features need extra protection during the colder months, which is why we recommend considering attractive decorative stones as a fuss-free alternative for your water feature.

blur-close-up-dried-leaves-713803

Autumn Gardening Tips: What to Plant and When

Even though the temperatures are dropping outside and the air is feeling ever crisper, the autumn is the perfect time to get most of your gardening done.

By putting in the work in your autumn garden now, you can enjoy homegrown veggies and a bloom of colour all year around. If you’re lucky, you might even get an extra early crop of your spring favourites.

It’s such a wonderful time to plant vegetables, flowers and trees as the soil is still deliciously warm and moist from the summer. This provides the perfect environment for seeds to germinate, for roots to form and for flavour to develop.

To help you make the most of this time, we’ve put together a list of our top autumn gardening tips. We’ve included a rundown of the vegetables and flowers you should include plus full tips on when to get them in the ground.

What to grow in the autumn: Vegetables

Onions

Onions are a tasty and versatile crop which are easy to grow and need little care. This makes them an excellent vegetable to plant this autumn.

When?

Anytime during the autumn.

Garlic

Just pop individual cloves in the ground this autumn or into raised beds and you’ll get a full head of garlic the following year. Easy!

When?

November is the ideal time, although you can plant any time until the spring.

Spring onions

Pop spring onions into your autumn garden to get ahead for next year. They’ll grow quickly and should be bursting with flavour and ready to pick by early spring.

When?

During September and October.

Perpetual Spinach

Grow perpetual spinach in your autumn garden and you’ll have a delicious crop to enjoy throughout the winter. Just make sure you keep picking leaves to ensure that your spinach keeps growing.

When?

Anytime during the autumn, before the first frost.

Broad Beans

Broad beans will help protect the soil in your autumn garden, add back essential nitrogen and, most importantly, taste utterly delicious.

When?

Sow in September or October.

Peas

Whether you’re keen to grow succulent peas in your autumn garden, or you’d prefer to grow beautiful, ornamental sweet peas for the flowers, now is the perfect time.

When?

Sow in pots of high-quality compost from September and October then pop into your greenhouse and cover with newspaper until the seedlings emerge.

Asparagus

Whilst asparagus does take several years to establish properly, autumn is the best time to get them into the ground. They make a wonderful attractive addition to your garden and taste absolutely delicious. Choose a spot where they won’t be disturbed and they have plenty of room to grow and you’ll have a crop within two years.

When?

Anytime this autumn.

Carrots

Plant carrots in the autumn, when the soil is still warm and they’ll have chance to grow deliciously sweet before the colder winter weather arrives. Be sure to protect these tiny seedings from the cold.

When?

Get them in the ground as soon as you can in the autumn- preferably 10-12 weeks before the first frost. If you’re using a greenhouse, you can sow them until November.

Spring Cabbage

Cabbage is a great source of nutrients which you can enjoy all year long. Choose fertile, well-drained soil which retains moisture well, add plenty of compost to keep your autumn garden nourished, and watch out for hungry slugs.

When?

Start in your greenhouse as in early September.

Kale

Kale is a hardy crop which won’t just survive the harshest of winters but will actually taste better because of it! Like cabbage, they need plenty of water and plenty of compost too.

When?

September or early October.

What to grow in autumn: flowering plants

Apple trees

The autumn is the ideal time to buy your apple trees and get them into the ground. Do this before the first frost strikes and you can enjoy their beautiful blossom in the spring. Soak the roots before you plant them, then plant into a sunny and sheltered position.

When?

Anytime before the first frost.

Daffodils

Plant brightly coloured daffodils in your autumn garden and you can enjoy some of the first flowers of spring! Buy a high-quality bulb, find a warm and sunny spot and plant into the soil or a container for the best blooms.

When?

October and November, before the first frost.

Hyacinths

For beautifully fragrant flowers in time for Christmas, plant those hyacinth bulbs into pots this autumn. They love a well-drained soil with a moderate amount of water and need to be popped into a cool dark place until the shoots reach approximately 5 cm. You can also plant directly in the soil in a place that receives full sun exposure.

When?

September or October.

English bluebell

Give your autumn garden a traditional English look by adding some bluebells to your autumn garden. They’re woodland flowers so demand plenty of shade and a rich, well-drained soil. When they flowering in April and May, you’ll also provide plenty of food for bees, butterflies and moths.

When?

During the autumn months.

Snowdrops

Snowdrops are a very popular spring bulb which demand moist and shaded specialist soil, but otherwise very little care. They’re also a pretty addition to any garden.

When?

Early autumn.

Roses

There are numerous varieties of roses which will add a classically beautiful look to your garden when they come into bloom between summer and autumn. Plant them now to give them plenty of time to get established. Make sure you protect them from wind and give them plenty of direct sunlight.

When?

During the autumn, before the first frost.

Get ahead this autumn by preparing your garden with a bounty of fresh vegetables and flowers which will deepen in flavour over the winter and provide something special when the spring comes back around. As always, give your garden a boost with Bury Hill premium grade topsoils!

How to keep your garden tidy

Your Ultimate Guide to Keeping Your Garden Tidy

A lush garden is a beautiful addition to any home, although everyone who has one knows the importance of keeping your garden tidy and thriving. Although there is always something new to learn about gardening, novice gardeners can have more questions about upkeep than those with some years of experience. Luckily, it’s mostly about knowing when to do what. By following a few easy steps, making sure your garden stays healthy and tidy isn’t that difficult at all. Follow our tips here:

How to Plan a Garden Tidy-up

To understand what to begin with when doing a garden tidy-up, first, you need to pinpoint what it is you want to achieve. Some gardens require more work than others. If you have just moved into a new property, you might see something neglected for years. In this case, there will be loads more to tackle than when you spruce up a garden after winter.

1. Make a List of Things to Do

Start by making a list of things you want to change or take on. Doing that allows you to pinpoint specific tasks that will need doing. Also, what is it that you want to achieve? Do you want your garden to be aesthetically more pleasing? Do you want to grow flowers, fruit, and vegetables? Is it about creating an outdoor space for family and friends?  Once you have this established, look at tasks at hand.

2. Prioritise Tasks

Now that you have your goals and an idea of tasks, it’s time to pinpoint, when to do what. Create a gardening calendar and fill in tasks. Different plants and flowers have a specific time when they need to be planted. Usually, you can find this information on the seed packet or consulting sales assistants in a gardening centre. Pruning can be done throughout the year, but again, it depends on the plant.

The best time to prune trees and bushes to stimulate growth is during the inactive period in winter. However, you can cut off dead wood anytime. For blooming trees, consider pruning after their spring flowers fade. If you want a beautiful lawn, consider laying lawn turf. Mid-autumn is the best time for this, however, you can do it until late winter, but before the soil is too wet or frosty.

3. Plan Your Garden Layout

Beautiful gardens are aesthetically pleasing and functional. It is much easier to do a garden tidy-up if everything is in the place it should be. Consider creating a dedicated space for different areas in your garden. If you grow fruit, vegetables, and herbs, create a patch where things would grow best. Does it have enough sunlight? Being close to the shed would also help. An area for socialising with friends and family is where you would want ornamental accents like a pond, decorative stone paths, and flowers.

Garden Tidy-Up Ideas

Simple tasks can go a long way in making your garden look pristine. More often than not, it’s all about prevention and maintenance.

  • Remove any moss or lichens from pathways, patios, stone features, and fencing.

  • Repair any damaged pathways, fences, garden furniture or any other disfigured element.

  • Tidy appearance of soil around plants by applying barks and woodchips. Mulching protects the roots, prevents moisture from escaping, and slows down the growth of weeds.

  • Introduce plants and flowers into unused and neglected areas in your garden.

  • Grow a hedge to separate your front garden from the street.

  • Add garden furniture to create a space that you and your family and friends can enjoy.

  • Create raised plant beds for growing vegetables, herbs, and fruit. Adding fresh topsoil ensures that the plants get enough nutrients.

Shed Tidy-up Ideas

Anyone who has ever had a garden shed knows that it can quickly turn into a mess that resembles a drawer, where you chuck everything that doesn’t have a place anywhere else. Keeping your garden shed tidy is one of the most important tasks as it will make the whole process of tidying up your garden much easier.

To tidy up your shed organise everything and put it in the appropriate place. Make sure the garden hose doesn’t have any knots and is rolled up nicely. Any long gardening tools like shovels, hoes, and rakes should be hung up. Have a dedicated space for pruners, shears, and other tools you use regularly. Ensure that all equipment is clean and dry after use, and put it in its designated spot.

Keeping Pond Water Clear

If you have a pond in your garden, remember to take care of it too. Ponds that are taken care of are a beautiful addition to your garden, but neglecting them will repel you or anyone else to go near them due to murky water or even smell.

The best time to clean the pond is in late autumn. If you have any fish or other creatures, they will be less active during this time. When changing the water in the pond, carefully remove any fish or other creatures into tanks. Before filling the pond up again, clean the surface liner with a brush.

During the summer, remember to top-up water levels if they drop during hot weather. Remove any floating weeds or leaves, or other debris. Every now and then spray some fresh water on the pond surface to improve oxygen levels and break the surface.